side effect of some poly Crest mother tincture

Homoeopathic remedies have some side effect, they are as follows:-

ASafoetida :
Children: Asafoetida is UNSAFEfor infants when taken by mouth because it might cause certain blood disorders. Pregnancy and breast-feeding: It is UNSAFE to take asafoetida by mouth if you are pregnant. It might cause a miscarriage. Avoid use. It is also UNSAFE to take asafoetida by mouth if you are breast-feeding. The chemicals in asafoetida could pass into breast milk and then cause bleeding disorders in the nursing infant. Avoid use.Bleeding disorders: There is concern that asafoetida might increase the risk of bleeding. Don’t use asafoetida if you have a bleeding disorder. Epilepsy or history of convulsions: Don’t use asafoetida if you have epilepsy or some other central nervous system condition that might lead to seizures or convulsions.Stomach and intestinal (gastrointestinal, GI) problems: Asafoetida can irritate the GI tract. Don’t use it of you have a GI infection or other GI condition. High blood pressure (hypertension) or low blood pressure (hypotension): There is some concern that asafoetida might interfere with blood pressure control. Avoid use if you have a blood pressure problem. Surgery: Asafoetida might slow blood clotting. There is concern that asafoetida might increase the risk of bleeding during and after surgery. Stop taking asafoetida at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.

Ashwagandha:
Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Do not use ashwagandha if you are pregnant. It is ratedLIKELY UNSAFE during pregnancy. There is some evidence that ashwagandha might cause miscarriages. Not enough is known about the use of ashwagandha during breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use. Diabetes: Ashwagandha might lower blood sugar levels. This could interfere with medications used for diabetes and cause blood sugar levels to go to low. If you have diabetes, monitor your blood sugar closely. High or low blood pressure: Ashwagandha might decrease blood pressure. This could cause blood pressure to go to low in people with low blood pressure; or interfere with medications used to treat high blood pressure. Ashwagandha should be used cautiously if you have low blood pressure or take medications for your blood pressure.Stomach ulcers: Ashwagandha can irritate the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Don’t use ashwagandha if you have a stomach ulcer.“Auto-immune diseases” such as multiple sclerosis (MS), lupus (systemic lupus erythematosusSLE), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), or other conditions: Ashwagandha might cause the immune system to become more active, and this could increase the symptoms of auto-immune diseases. If you have one of these conditions, it’s best to avoid using ashwagandha. Surgery: Ashwagandha may slow down the central nervous system. Healthcare providers worry that anesthesia and other medications during and after surgery might increase this effect. Stop taking ashwagandha at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery. Thyroid disorders: Ashwagandha might increase thyroid hormone levels. Ashwagandha should be used cautiously or avoided if you have a thyroid condition or take thyroid hormone medications.

Avena sativa:
Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Avens might beUNSAFE to take if you are pregnant. It seems to affect the menstrual cycle, and this might cause a miscarriage.

Calandula:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Don’t take calendula by mouth if you are pregnant. It isLIKELY UNSAFE. There is a concern that it might cause a miscarriage. It’s best to avoid topical use as well until more is known. There is not enough reliable information about the safety of using calendula if you are breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.Allergy to ragweed and related plants: Calendula may cause an allergic reaction in people who are sensitive to the Asteraceae/Compositae family. Members of this family include ragweed, chrysanthemums, marigolds, daisies, and many others. If you have allergies, be sure to check with your healthcare provider before taking calendula.Surgery: Calendula might cause too much drowsiness if combined with medications used during and after surgery. Stop taking calendula at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.

Capsicum:
But it isPOSSIBLY UNSAFE for your baby if you take capsicum by mouth. Skin problems (dermatitis) have been reported in breast-fed infants when mothers eat foods heavily spiced with capsicum peppers. Children: Applying capsicum to the skin of children under two years of age is POSSIBLY UNSAFE. Not enough is known about the safety of giving capsicum to children by mouth. Don’t do it. Damaged or broken skin: Don’t use capsicum on damaged or broken skin. Surgery: Capsicum might increase bleeding during and after surgery. Stop using capsicum at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.

Chirata:
Pregnancy and breast-feeding: There is not enough reliable information about the safety of taking chirata if you are pregnant or breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.Diabetes. Chirata might lower blood sugar levels in some people. Watch for signs of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) and monitor your blood sugar carefully if you have diabetes and use chirata as a medicine. Intestinal (duodenal) ulcers: Chirata can make ulcers in the intestine worse. Surgery. Chirata might lower blood sugar. In theory, chirata might interfere with blood sugar control during and after surgical procedures. Stop using chirata as a medicine at least two weeks before a scheduled surgery.

Cinchona:
Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Don’t use cinchona if you are pregnant or breast-feeding. There is some evidence that cinchona isUNSAFE to use during pregnancy. Not much is known about the safety of using cinchona if you are breast-feeding, so it’s best to avoid it.Stomach or intestinal ulcers: Don’t use cinchona if you have ulcers. It might increase the risk of bleeding. Surgery: Cinchona can slow blood clotting, so there is a concern that it might increase the risk of extra bleeding during and after surgery. Stop using cinchona at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.

Damiana:
Pregnancy and breast-feeding:There is not enough reliable information about the safety of taking damiana if you are pregnant or breast feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.Diabetes: Damiana might affect blood sugar levels in people with diabetes. Watch for signs of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) and monitor your blood sugar carefully if you have diabetes and use damiana. Surgery: Since damiana seems to affect blood glucose levels, there is a concern that it might interfere with blood glucose control during and after surgery. Stop using damiana at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.

Echinecea:
Pregnancy or breast-feeding: Not enough is known about the use of echinacea during pregnancy and breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use. “Auto-immune disorders” such as such as multiple sclerosis (MS), lupus (systemic lupus erythematosusSLE), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), a skin disorder called pemphigus vulgaris, or others: Echinacea might have an effect on the immune system that could make these conditions worse. Don’t take echinacea if you have an auto-immune disorder. An inherited tendency toward allergies (atopy): People with this condition are more likely to develop an allergic reaction to echinacea. It’s best to avoid exposure to echinacea if you have this condition.

Eucalyptus:
Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Eucalyptus isLIKELY SAFE for pregnant and breast-feeding women when consumed in food amounts. But don’t use eucalyptus oil. Not enough is known about safety during pregnancy or breast-feeding. Children: Eucalyptus oil is LIKELY UNSAFE for children. It should not be taken by mouth or applied to the skin. Not much is known about the safety of using eucalyptus leaves in children. It’s best to avoid use in amounts larger than food amounts. Diabetes: Early research suggests eucalyptus leaf might lower blood sugar. There is concern that using eucalyptus while taking medications for diabetes might lower blood sugar too much. Blood sugar levels should be monitored closely. Surgery: Since eucalyptus might affect blood sugar levels, there is concern that it might make blood sugar control difficult during and after surgery. Stop using eucalyptus at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.

Ginger:
Ginger is LIKELY SAFE for most people. Some people can have mild side effects including heartburn, diarrhea, and general stomach discomfort. Some women have reported extra menstrual bleeding while taking ginger. When ginger is applied to the skin, it may cause irritation. Special Precautions & Warnings:Pregnancy: Using ginger during pregnancy is controversial. There is some concern that ginger might affect fetal sex hormones. There is also a report of miscarriage during week 12 of pregnancy in a woman who used ginger for morning sickness. However, studies in pregnant women suggest that ginger can be used safely for morning sickness without harm to the baby. The risk for major malformations in infants of women taking ginger does not appear to be higher than the usual rate of 1% to 3%. Also there doesn’t appear to be an increased risk of early labor or low birth weight. There is some concern that ginger might increase the risk of bleeding, so some experts advise againsting using it close to your delivery date. As with any medication given during pregnancy, it’s important to weigh the benefit against the risk. Before using ginger during pregnancy, talk it over with your healthcare provider. Breast-feeding: Not enough is known about the safety of using ginger during breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and don’t use it.Bleeding disorders: Taking ginger might increase your risk of bleeding. Diabetes: Ginger might lower your blood sugar. As a result, your diabetes medications might need to be adjusted by your healthcare provider. Heart conditions: High doses of ginger might worsen some heart conditions.

Ginkgo:
Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Ginkgo isPOSSIBLY UNSAFE when taken by mouth during pregnancy. It might cause early labor or extra bleeding during delivery if used near that time. Not enough is known about the safety of using ginkgo during breast-feeding. Do not use ginkgo if you are pregnant or breast-feeding.Infants and children: Ginkgo leaf extract isPOSSIBLY SAFE when taken by mouth for a short time. Some research suggests that a specific combination of ginkgo leaf extract plus American ginseng might be safe in children when used short-term. Do not let children eat the ginkgo seed. It is LIKELY UNSAFE.Diabetes: Ginkgo might interfere with the management of diabetes. If you have diabetes, monitor your blood sugar closely. Seizures: There is a concern that ginkgo might cause seizures. If you have ever had a seizure, don’t use ginkgo. Infertility: Ginkgo use might interfere with getting pregnant. Discuss your use of ginkgo with your healthcare provider if you are trying to get pregnant. Bleeding disorders: Ginkgo might make bleeding disorders worse. If you have a bleeding disorder, don’t use ginkgo. Surgery: Ginkgo might slow blood clotting. It might cause extra bleeding during and after surgery. Stop using ginkgo at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.

Panax ginseng:
Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Panax ginseng is POSSIBLY UNSAFE when taking by mouth during pregnancy. One of the chemicals in Panax ginseng has been found to cause birth defects in animals. Do not use Panax ginseng if you are pregnant. Not enough is known about the safety of Panax ginseng during breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and don’t use it.Infants and children: Panax ginseng is LIKELY UNSAFE in infants and children. Using Panax ginseng in babies has been linked to poisoning that can be fatal. The safety of Panax ginseng in older children is not known. Until more is known, do not use Panax ginseng even in older children. “Auto-immune diseases” such as multiple sclerosis (MS), lupus (systemic lupus erythematosusSLE), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), or other conditions: Panax ginseng seems to increase the activity of the immune system. It might make auto-immune diseases worse. Don’t use Panax ginseng if you have any auto-immune condition. Bleeding conditions: Panax ginseng seems to interfere with blood clotting. Don’t use Panax ginseng if you have a bleeding condition. Heart conditions: Panax ginseng can affect heart rhythm and blood pressure slightly on the first day it is used. However, there are usually no changes with continued use. Nevertheless, Panax ginseng has not been studied in people with cardiovascular disease. Use Panax ginseng with caution if you have heart disease. Diabetes: Panax ginseng might lower blood sugar. In people with diabetes who are taking medications to lower blood sugar, adding Panax ginseng might lower blood sugar too much. Monitor your blood sugar closely if you have diabetes and use Panax ginseng.Hormone-sensitive conditions such as breast cancer, uterine cancer, ovarian cancer, endometriosis, or uterine fibroids: Panax ginseng contains chemicals (ginsenosides) that can act like estrogen. If you have any condition that might be made worse by exposure to estrogen, don’t use Panax ginseng.Trouble sleeping (insomnia): High doses of Panax ginseng have been linked with insomnia. If you have trouble sleeping, use Panax ginseng with caution. Schizophrenia (a mental disorder): High doses of Panax ginseng have been linked with sleep problems and agitation in people with schizophrenia. Be careful when using Panax ginseng if you have schizophrenia.Organ transplant: Panax ginseng might make the immune system more active. This could interfere with the effectiveness of medications that are given after an organ transplant to reduce the chance that the organ will be rejected. If you have received an organ transplant, don’t use Panax ginseng.

Ipecac:
Children: Ipecac is LIKELY SAFE for children when used appropriately as a prescription product to induce vomiting. However, the American Academy of Pediatrics’ recommendation to keep a 1-ounce bottle of syrup of ipecac at home has recently been reversed. The new statement reads, “Syrup of ipecac should no longer be routinely used as a poison treatment intervention in the home.” The thinking is that keeping ipecac at home hasn’t been proven to save lives. Talk with your healthcare provider or poison control center about how to use ipecac correctly in cases of poisoning in children. Ipecac is UNSAFE when used in high doses or in children under the age of one year. Children are more sensitive than adults to the side effects of ipecac. Misuse of ipecac can lead to serious poisoning, heart damage, and death. Signs of poisoning include difficulty breathing, digestive tract problems, abnormal heart rates, blood in the urine, convulsions, shock, coma, and death.Pregnancy and breast-feeding: It is LIKELY UNSAFE to use ipecac if you are pregnant. It might stimulate the uterus and cause a miscarriage. Not enough is known about the safety of using ipecac if you are breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.Unconsciousness or certain kinds of poisonings: Ipecac should not be used in people who are unconscious or have been poisoned with certain chemicals including corrosives, petroleum products, strychnine, and others. Talk to your healthcare provider or poison control center about whether ipecac is appropriate to use in each case of suspected poisoning. If ipecac is used incorrectly, serious complications can arise including damage of the esophagus, pneumonia, and convulsions.Digestive tract problems including ulcers, infections, or Crohn’s disease: Ipecac can irritate the digestive tract. Don’t use it if you have one of these conditions. Heart disease: Ipecac can affect the heart. Don’t use it if you have a heart condition.

Neem:
Children: Taking neem seeds or oil by mouth isLIKELY UNSAFE for children. Serious side effects in infants and small children can happen within hours after taking neem oil. These serious side effects include vomiting, diarrhea, drowsiness, blood disorders, seizures, loss of consciousness, coma, brain disorders, and death. Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Neem oil and neem bark are LIKELY UNSAFEwhen taken by mouth during pregnancy. They can cause a miscarriage. Not enough is known about the safety of need during breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use. “Auto-immune diseases” such as multiple sclerosis (MS), lupus (systemic lupus erythematosusSLE), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), or other conditions: Neem might cause the immune system to become more active. This could increase the symptoms of auto-immune diseases. If you have one of these conditions, it’s best to avoid using neem. Diabetes: There is some evidence that neem can lower blood sugar levels and might cause blood sugar to go too low. If you have diabetes and use neem, monitor your blood sugar carefully. It might be necessary to change the dose of your diabetes medication. Reduced ability to have children (infertility): There is some evidence that neem can harm sperm. It might also reduce fertility in other ways. If you are trying to have children, avoid using neem. Organ transplant: There is a concern that neem might decrease the effectiveness of medications that are used to prevent organ rejection. Do not use neem if you have had an organ transplant. Surgery: Neem might lower blood sugar levels. There is a concern that it might interfere with blood sugar control during and after surgery. Stop using neem at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.

Papaya:
Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Papaya isPOSSIBLY UNSAFE when taken by mouth during pregnancy. Do not take papaya by mouth in medicinal amounts if you are pregnant. There is some evidence that unprocessed papain, one of the chemicals found in papaya, might poison the fetus or cause birth defects. Not enough is known about the safety of papaya during breast-feeding. It is best to avoid taking it in amounts higher than normal food amounts. Diabetes: Papaya that has been fermented can lower blood sugar. People with diabetes who are taking medications to lower their blood sugar should pay close attention to their blood sugar as adjustments to medications might be needed. Low blood sugar: Papaya that has been fermented can lower blood sugar. Taking this form of papaya might make blood sugar too low in people who already have low blood sugar. Papain allergy: Papaya contains papain. If you are allergic to papain, avoid eating papaya or taking products that contain papaya.Latex allergy: If you are allergic to latex, there is a good chance you are also be allergic to papaya. If you have a latex allergy, avoid eating papaya or taking products that contain papaya.Surgery: Papaya that has been fermented can lower blood sugar. In theory, this form of papaya might affect blood sugary during and after surgery. If you are taking papaya, you should stop 2 weeks before surgery.

Pulsatilla:
Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Pulsatilla isUNSAFE when taken by mouth during pregnancy. Both the fresh plant and the dried plant might cause a miscarriage or birth defects. Applying fresh pulsatilla directly to the skin is also considered UNSAFE. Don’t do it. Not enough is known about the safety of applying dried pulsatilla directly to the skin during pregnancy. Stay on the safe side and avoid use. It’s UNSAFE to take fresh pulsatilla by mouth or apply it to the skin during breast-feeding. Not enough is known about the safety of the dried plant when taken by mouth or applied to the skin. Don’t use it.

Strophanthus:
Pregnancy and breast-feeding: It’s UNSAFE to use strophanthus if you are pregnant. It might make the uterus contract, and this could cause a miscarriage. It’s also UNSAFE to use strophanthus if you are breast-feeding. Heart conditions: Strophanthus may cause irregular heartbeat. Don’t use strophanthus if you have a heart condition, without the direct supervision of a healthcare provider.

Terminalia:
Pregnancy: There is some evidence that Terminalia arjuna is POSSIBLY UNSAFE during pregnancy. The safety of the other two species during pregnancy is unknown. It’s best to avoid using any terminalia species. Breast-feeding: There is not enough reliable information about the safety of Terminalia if you are breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.Diabetes: Terminalia might lower blood sugar levels. Your diabetes medications might need to be adjusted by your healthcare provider.Surgery: Terminalia might decrease blood sugar levels and interfere with blood sugar control during surgery. Stop taking Terminalia at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.

Thuja:
Pregnancy and breast-feeding: It’s LIKELY UNSAFE to take thuja by mouth if you are pregnant. Thuja might cause a miscarriage. It is also LIKELY UNSAFE to take thuja by mouth if you are breast-feeding because of possible toxicity. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.“Auto-immune diseases” such as multiple sclerosis (MS), lupus (systemic lupus erythematosusSLE), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), or other conditions: Thuja might cause the immune system to become more active, and this could increase the symptoms of auto-immune diseases. If you have one of these conditions, it’s best to avoid using thuja.Seizures: Taking thuja might cause seizures in some people. Don’t take thuja if you have a history of having seizures.

Tribulus:
Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Taking tribulus during pregnancy is POSSIBLY UNSAFE. Animal research suggests that tribulus might harm fetal development. Not enough is known about the safety of using tribulus during breast-feeding. It’s best not to use tribulus if you are pregnant or nursing. Prostate problems or prostate cancer: There is a concern that tribulus might make prostate conditions such as benign prostate hypertrophy (BPH) or prostate cancer worse. Developing research suggests that tribulus can increase prostate weight. Diabetes. Tribulus might decrease blood sugar levels. Dose of diabetes medications might need to be adjusted by your healthcare provider. Surgery: Tribulus might affect blood sugar levels. This might interfere with blood sugar control during and after surgery. Stop using tribulus at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.

Yohimbe:
Pregnancy or breast-feeding: Yohimbe isLIKELY UNSAFE. Yohimbe might affect the uterus and endanger the pregnancy. It might also poison the unborn child. Don’t take yohimbe if you are pregnant or breast-feeding.Bleeding conditions: Taking yohimbe might increase the risk of bleeding in people with bleeding disorders. Schizophrenia: Use yohimbe with caution. The yohimbine in yohimbe might make people with schizophrenia psychotic. Prostate problems: Use yohimbe with caution. Yohimbe might make the symptoms of BPH (benign prostatic hyperplasia) worse. Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD): Don’t use yohimbe. There is a report that four individuals with PTSD suffered worse symptoms after using yohimbe. Liver disease: Don’t use yohimbe. Liver disease might change the way the body processes yohimbe. Kidney disease: Don’t use yohimbe. There is a concern that yohimbine might slow or stop the flow of urine. High blood pressure or low blood pressure: Don’t use yohimbe. Small amounts of yohimbine can increase blood pressure. Large amounts can cause dangerously low pressure. Chest pain or heart disease: Don’t use yohimbe. Yohimbine can seriously harm the heart. Anxiety: Don’t use yohimbe. Yohimbine might make anxiety worse. Depression: Don’t use yohimbe. Yohimbine might bring out manic-like symptoms in people with bipolar depression or suicidal tendencies in individuals with depression. Diabetes: Don’t use yohimbe. Yohimbe might interfere with insulin and other medications used for diabetes and cause low blood sugar. Surgery: Yohimbe might increase the risk for bleeding. People who take yohimbe should stop at least 2 weeks before surgery.

Bibliography:
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